Tag: Sentient Spaces

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Manufactured Animals

Delivery Drones Are Coming

Drones are typically thought of as flying spying robots, or even worse flying spying shooting robots. But could we also employ drones for good? Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos certainly thinks so. In a 60 Minutes interview, he announced that Amazon wants to use octocopters to deliver your order within a half hour at any location you choose.

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Humane-Technology

Use a Touchscreen Without Touching it

The development of touch technology has opened many possibilities of interaction with our electronic devices. Until now, you’ve had to physically touch the screen in order to interact with it. To solve this issue Tom Carter, PhD student at the University of Bristol’s Interaction and Graphics, designed UltraHaptics.

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Talking Window
Digital-Presence

The Talking Window: a New Audio Medium

The streets of marketing are endless, and sometimes intrusive. The latest space to be taken over by advertising is the train window. The broadcast company Sky is experimenting with this medium to advertise its products on German public transportation.

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Nongenetic Evolution

Colorado Town votes on License to Hunt Drones

Are Drones the mosquitoes of the 21st century? They are rapidly propagating, while getting smaller and smaller. Soon they will be everywhere: Buzzing around you, spying on you and potentially attacking you.

A small town of Deer Trail, Colorado is considering a bold move towards the wild robotics. The town board will be voting on an ordinance that would create drone hunting licenses and offer bounties for shooting down the unmanned aerial vehicles.

$25 drone hunting license for residents 21 year of age, valid for one year.
$25 drone hunting license for residents 21 year of age, valid for one year.

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Bionics

What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks

Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control.

What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at Stanford, found that the algorithm desert ants use to regulate foraging is like the Traffic Control Protocol (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both ant and human networks use positive feedback: either from acknowledgements that trigger the transmission of the next data packet, or from food-laden returning foragers that trigger the exit of another outgoing forager.

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