Tag: Suburban Utopia

Suburban Utopia

Swedish Underground Cabins

If you try to picture a modern city in your mind, it is almost inevitable to think about high buildings. In this era we are reaching for the sky. Back in the 17th century however, something different was happening in Sweden.

They are called ‘backstuga’, literally meaning hill cottages, as most of the houses were actually built low in the ground against hills. By doing this it was possible to use only three walls with the forth one being the bare ground.

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Made-to-debate

Hacking And Controlling Cars Remotely

Two American hackers, Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek, during the last two years have been working on hacking cars to takeover full control of vehicles. At the beginning of the project in 2013, their hacks had limitations: they had to sit in the back of the car with their laptops hooked up with wires to the cars central nervous system. Today the two hackers have gone wireless, operating over the internet.

This was possible because car manufactures are implementing smart inter-connective technologies and integrating WiFi hot spots into their products. The only thing a hacker needs to know is the car IP address to take full control over the car, anytime anywhere. “From an attacker’s perspective, it’s a super nice vulnerability”Miller says. “This is what everyone who thinks about car security has worried about for years. This is a reality”.

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Read more at: Wired

Suburban Utopia

Surveillance Gulls

From far away Czech artist Jakub Geltner‘s latest work appears as a flock of seagulls gathered on rocks. Looking closer your realize they are not perched birds, but surveillance cameras the artist has set up as a part of his series Nest.

This installation, titled Nest 05, explores the notion of surveillance in even our most peaceful places, the areas we seek when we want to escape. Geltner focuses on the growing presence of cameras cities, letting viewers decide whether or not that presence is desirable.

Source: The Creators Project

Anthropocene

Art Installation Submerges Amsterdam

“God created the earth, but the Dutch created the Netherlands” Voltaire said in the 18th century. Waterlicht is a recent project by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde that reminds us about this quote and therefore how humans have had an impact on the landscape of the Netherlands.

As a virtual flood submerging Museum Square in Amsterdam, Waterlicht shows how high the water could reach in the Dutch capital without human intervention.

“Waterlicht shows how the Netherlands looks like without waterworks — a virtual flood. Innovation is seen throughout our landscape, pushed by the waterworks and our history, but yet we almost seem to have forgotten this” says Daan Roosegaarde.

The Rijksmuseum recent acquisition of the 17th century painting by Jan Asselijndepicting the 1651 Amsterdam flood was the impetus for the exhibition over Museum Square. Both pieces reflect on the water history of the Netherlands and the interaction between man, nature and technology.

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Story via TheVerge. Photos and video via Studio Roosegaarde.

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