Tag: Suburban Utopia

roof-tile
Anthropocene

Cleaning the Air with Roof Tiles

Cleaning air pollution is a task usually assigned to urban green areas. The next solution in improving air quality could be smog-busting roof tiles.
A research has revealed the potential of roofing tiles to turn every house into a spot for clean air.

Students at University of California found that titanium dioxide, a chalky-white compound, breaks down the nitrogen oxides into much less harmful compounds. Ordinary clay roof tiles sprayed with titanium dioxide removed 88% to 97% of nitrogen oxide pollution from the air. It has been calculated that if 1 million roofs were sprayed with the smog-eating compound, the tiles could remove 21 tons of nitrogen oxides from the air each day.

Beijing might like this method to solve its big smog problem, one tile at a time!

Read more at UCR Today

Over
Anthropocene

The Earth As You’ve Never Seen It Before

This series of images, called Overviews, shows overhead satellite views of the Earth, focusing on the places where human activity has shaped the landscape.

From our line of sight on the Earth’s surface, it’s impossible to completely understand the complexity of the systems we have created and the impact that we have had on our planet.

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loon
Digital-Presence

Balloon-Powered Internet For Everyone

Both Google and Facebook have challenging intentions to bring the Internet to the next billion people, and while Zuckerberg’s dream involves drones with lasers, Google is planning to create a hot air balloon network.

With a system of balloons traveling on the edge of space, Project Loon will attempt to connect to internet the two-thirds of the world’s population that doesn’t have access to the Net.

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redbutton
Design-for-debate

You Push the Button, It Does the Rest

A stand-alone physical button that connects to the internet. Alone, it doesn’t do much. But connected with the cloud servers at bt.tn, it can do pretty much what you want! Using this simple button, you can harness the power of various Internet technologies, such as HTTP, Twitter, Facebook, email, or SMS.

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148755058
Back to the Tribe

Indigenous Shopping in the Supermarket

Look at these incredible images of native Africans shopping in a supermarket in Opuwo, Namibia.

Two merging realities, different worlds overlapping inside that modern jungle we call supermarket. The situation is disorienting and absolutely fascinating.

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Floating-city-by-Atdesign
Dynamic-architecture

Floating Underwater Self-Sufficient City

Underwater malls with transparent walls and spectacular undersea views, recreational green spaces below the surface of water, floating hotels and submarines connections, buoyant farms and vertical gardens.

Is this a dream for a human size aquarium city? No, Asian architects of AT Design Office has seriously developed a concept for a four square miles ocean metropolis!

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up
Boomeranged Metaphors

In Suburbia Anything Can Happen

She refused to sell her home, now her 108-year-old farmhouse is surrounded by new buildings. In 2006 a construction company offered to Edith Macefield, owner of this small house in Seattle, a million dollars to demolish her home and make way for a commercial development.

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pb-090614-powerlines-9a.photoblog900
Anthropocene

DIY Wire Networks In India

The growing demand of electricity and digital communication has a major impact on Indian urban areas.

The increasing use of electronic devices in daily life and the ways we relate to them affect also fast developing countries, like India. This modernization process has led to the creation of DIY electrical and digital communication network in some areas of New Delhi.

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HAlCuTau
Anthropocene

H / AlCuTaAu: a New Artificial Mineral

Revital Cohen and Tuur van Balen created an artificial mineral made of technological artifacts. To produce it they deconstructed devices, such as computers, recovering the valuable materials.

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APTOPIX Art Gallery
manufactured-landscapes

Geometry in the Sky

These contrails you see are planes flying overhead, forming a nextnatural backdrop behind the National Museum of Art in Washington DC. Peculiar image of the week. Via BBC Future

Related Post: Nextnatural Sky