Tag: Suburban Utopia

vegetable lamb of tartary
Food Technology

The Sci-Fi Prehistory of “Victimless” Meat

The idea of “disembodied” meat, whether grown from trees or in the lab, has been around for at least a century – if not way longer. The medieval notion of the “vegetable lamb of Tartary”, a live sheep that sprouts from a plant, could be thought of as the great-granddaddy of “victimless” meat. However, the idea of truly in vitro meat had to wait for the invention of cell culture. No doubt French surgeon Alexis Carrell pondered taking a nibble of an immortal drumstick when he created an “immortal” chicken heart cell line in 1912.

Perhaps the earliest explicit mentions of cultured meat comes from British statesman Frederick Edwin Smith. In 1930, Smith predicted that “it will no longer be necessary to go to the extravagant length of rearing a bullock in order to eat its steak. From one ‘parent’ steak of choice tenderness it will be possible to grow as large and as juicy a steak as can be desired.” Winston Churchill famously echoed this sentiment only two years later. According to Technovelty, in vitro meat made its first appearance in fiction in 1952. Since then, sci-fi authors have described inspiring, bizarre and uncanny speculative meat futures. Click through for some of the most evocative…

Next Nature is continuing the tradition of visionary lab-grown meat speculation: Support our crowdfunding campaign for the world’s first in vitro meat cookbook!

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600x400_1365604615_313370-facedoek 2
Back to the Tribe

Face ‘doek’

This Face ‘doek’ (Dutch for blanket) was designed by eighteen year old Noortje van Steenis and put in the corridor of her high school as a protest against the addiction of her fellow students to Facebook. She doesn’t have a Facebook account herself. The Facedoek functions like an old fashioned announcement space. Everyone is allowed to write on it. Peculiar image of the week. Picture by Marcel van den Berg.

3D birdhouse
Fake-nature

Birdhouse Sweet Birdhouse

3D printer company MakerBot recently launched a contest inviting designers to create the birdhouse of the future. The winner is The American Craftsman Bungalow by Brent J. Rosenburgh, a detailed 3D-printed birdhouse made in the likeness of a human home. For a ‘birdhouse of the future’, the design seems quite nostalgic. We would certainly love to live there, but would birds consider it the house of their dreams?

Related Posts: Google Birdhouse, Pet Dreamhouse.

greenbutt_render_2
Biomimicmarketing

Eco-Friendly Filter Sprouts Flowers

These 100% biodegradable cigarette filters, called Greenbutts, deteriorate in one month rather than the typical 15 years. They are made from a natural blend of materials, including flax, hemp and cotton.

The company even designed a version with seeds inside, which sprout flowers when planted in soil, making for a very next natural way of gardening. Will this eco-friendly filter help the environment or just encourage littering? We’ll discover it soon: Greenbutts will be on sale in early 2014.

Back to the Tribe

Kid Convinces Mother to go Vegan

While numerous children nowadays believe the woods smell of shampoo, there are also some critical young minds out there, willing to question things. Meet Luiz Antonio. When his mother tells him to eat his octopus, little Luiz responds by asking his mother where the octopus comes from and how it ended up on his plate. The mother explains the situation to Luiz, after which he responds with a pleading that drives his mother to tears.

modern_fatamorgana_picture_by_dennis_van_Tilburg
Biomimicmarketing

Modern Fata Morgana

Imagine bumping into a cola dispenser after a hike in the pristine Canadian forests for three days. Would you believe your eyes? Must be a modern Fata Morgana.

It happened to Dennis van Tilburg, who sent us this peculiar image of the week. The biomimic-marketing on the can dispenser only adds peculiar points to the scene. We are living in postcard nature.

3D printed food
Food Technology

3D Printed Food, Meet Willy Wonka

There has been talk of 3D printed food for a long time. We saw meals materialized out of thin air in Star Trek. A few years ago, a beautifully designed food printer was featured on this blog, if only in an artist’s impression, with the end product being a brownish drop of liquid. But when will this elusive printer finally be here, in real life? It turns out it already is.

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