Tag: The-map-is-the-territory


Space Archeologist Unlocks Secrets of Ancient Civilizations

Sarah Parcak is a pioneering “satellite archaeologist” from University of Alabama, a sort of Indiana Jones with 21st century tech. She has been awarded the 2016 TED Prize for her work applying infrared imagery from satellites to help locate ancient sites lost in time. Her revolutionary methods helped her discover ancient cities and astonishing sites around the world, but especially in Egypt, where she came across 17 unknown pyramids, more than 1000 tombs and 3100 settlements.

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Analogue vs Digital: Never Lost with GPS

Before global positioning systems, we all used maps. And they could be very annoying. Stopping along the way because you didn’t remember which turn you should take, the clumsy sizes and hard way to fold it back. Never mind the arguments on map reading skills… Whew! It all belongs to the past. Maps and satellite navigation devices are the best invention! But don’t lose your mind.

The results of people blindly following digital directions into large bodies of water, the wrong way on a busy road, and yes, even trees, show that we might have all become just a little too reliant on those helpful voices that guide us along our way. From the Analogue vs Digital Memory Game.


Don’t Trust Dictionaries and Maps

The definition of the word “mountweazel” is the following: “any invented word or name inserted in a reference work by a publisher for the purpose of detecting plagiarism”. In her funny and informative podcast on linguistic facts, English writer Helen Zaltzman from The Allusionist, explores the existence of fake entries in dictionaries and encyclopedias.

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liam young
Manufactured Landscapes

Interview: Liam Young on Speculative Architecture and Engineering the Future

Liam Young is a speculative architect who, in his own words, “operates in the spaces between design, fiction and futures”. With his London-based design think tank, Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today, he explores the future implications of emerging urban developments. Named by Blueprint magazine as one of 25 people who will change architecture and design, Young uses fiction and film to discuss probable futures. He has also co-founded Unknown Fields Division with Kate Davies, an award winning nomadic workshop that travels on annual expeditions to the ends of the Earth, investigating unreal and forgotten landscapes, alien terrains and industrial ecologies. Unknown Fields have developed projects through expeditions from the Ecuadorian Amazon and the Galapagos Islands to North Alaska, the mining landscapes of the Australian Outback, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Recently, Young gave an interesting lecture at the Sonic Acts Festival 2015 in Amsterdam. His visually engaging storytelling took the audience on a virtual trip with the infamous celebrity Kim Kardashian, whose derriere broke the internet recently. During his talk, he meditated on the emergence of virtual landscapes and hinted at new futures originated by developing technologies. On that occasion, we talked to Liam Young about his work in speculative architecture, the future, and our role as humans in relation to the nature.

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Scientists could Reveal a Parallel Universe

One of the most expensive scientific instruments ever built, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, will be driven to its highest energy levels in an attempt to detect or create mini black holes. If the experiment proves to be successful, scientists hope to reveal a new universe.

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Back to the Tribe

Google Street View Camel

Usually the images for Google Street View are collected with a car, but for the first time, the task has been given to an animal: a camel.
The Google Camel carries the camera on top of its hump to capture panoramic views through the desert around Liwa Oasis. The use of the animal was meant to avoid having any kind of impact on the surrounding environment.
Combining high-tech imagery equipment with an ancient mode of transport: sometimes modern technologies can revive ancient impulses.

Source: Techcrunch