Tag: The-World-is-Flat

Global-Image-Economy

Dubai Globe: Sea versus Economy

Above: artist impression 2003 | below: Nasa January 2010


When developers launched the globe project just off Dubai’s coast in 2003, they hoped that the rich and famous would land there to populate the 300 islands.
Within five years Nakheel Properties leveled up 11 billion cubic feet of sand and 47 million tons of rock. However, a year ago (2009) the work stopped and now it looks like the project will never be completed. While officially the project has just been delayed, the obvious conclusion would be that it is the economic recession causing the islands to gradually wash back into the sea.

Read more (4 reactions)

Digital-Presence

First tweet from space

That’s one small tweet for man, one giant tweet for mankind.

The virtual realm has physically expanded once again as Timothy Creamer a.k.a. Astro_TJ made Twitter history by being the first person to tweet live from space.

Quote: twitter.com/NASA_Astronauts: “Hello Twitterverse! We r now LIVE tweeting from the International Space Station — the 1st live tweet from Space! (cont)”

Read more (7 reactions)

Corporature

Colalife

cola.jpg
Coca-Cola© succeeds in what most NGO’s try to achieve: getting the goods to the poor in the 3rd world  Africa. For most people there, a Coke is easier to get and cheaper than a bottle of drinking water. One might say that we shouldn’t encourage them to drink that much Coke, but we can also use the system. Colalife© aims to use the efficiency of the Coca-Cola distribution chain to ship medicines to the places that need them. Parasiting on the crates of Coke, the containers fit perfectly in the spaces unused.

Read more (8 reactions)

Back to the Tribe

No Signal

As technology evolves, people are more and more depending on it to function properly. But the nature of technology is that it needs networks, sources, software, batteries and signal. Once these conditions fail, horror scenarios unfold for those who depend…

Supercut video by fourfour.typepad.com | Related: Cellphone Minutes, the Next Currency, Crackberry Addicts, Handset gets taken to the grave.

Read more (3 reactions)

Digital-Presence

The Internet Mapping Project

mapping project 01
Kevin Kelly — senior maverick at Wired — asks people how they see the internet and if they can, visualize it. Here is how:

“The internet is vast. Bigger than a city, bigger than a country, maybe as big as the universe. It’s expanding by the second. No one has seen its borders. And the internet is intangible, like spirits and angels. The web is an immense ghost land of disembodied places. Who knows if you are even there, there. Yet everyday we navigate through this ethereal realm for hours on end and return alive. We must have some map in our head.
I’ve become very curious about the maps people have in their minds when they enter the internet. So I’ve been asking people to draw me a map of the internet as they see it. That’s all. More than 50 people of all ages and levels of expertise have mapped their geography of online.”

About the project | Download pdf and participate | View more maps;

Read more (9 reactions)

Global-Image-Economy

Unfolding the Earth – Myriahedral projections

Unfolding the Earth - Myriahedral projectionsHow can we unfold the Earth? Making a map of the earth is an ancient problem. For thousands of years cartographers, mathematicians, and inventors have developed methods to flatten the curved surface of the earth into a 2D plane. The main problem is that you cannot do this perfectly, such that both the shape and size of the surface are depicted properly everywhere, hence the result is never neutral.

Visualization professor Jack van Wijk developed a new method of unfolding the earth: Myriahedral projections. The idea is take a map of a small part of the earth, which is almost perfect, glue neighboring maps to it, and repeat this until the whole earth is shown. Of course you get interrupts, but does this matter?

Read more (11 reactions)

Boomeranged Metaphors

Windows XP Revisited

windows xp revisited

The most distributed image ever is being phased out. What remains is a hill in Sonoma Valley, California.

Charles O’Rear used to pass that hill almost daily between his home in Napa and his wife, Daphne, who lived in Marin County. He always carried his medium format camera.

Read more (9 reactions)

Welcome back!

We have noticed you are a frequent visitor to our website. Do you think we are doing a good job? Support us by becoming a member.

Join