Tag: Toys-are-Us

Wheel
Design-for-debate

The Human Hamster Wheel Desk

Running on the hamster wheel, it will no longer be just a metaphor for a repetitive and tiring life. We are spending a big part of our day – and life – in the office, where the desk has already undergone some makeovers, such has the Smart Desk and the Apple Desk.
The Human Hamster Wheel Desk, by designer Robb Godshaw and developer Will Doenlen, is the latest result of workspace evolution: an oversize wheel for devoted employees, where they can stand and walk, forever staying in the same place. Technology and office work have domesticated us!

Story via Inhabitat

Designed-by-Evolution

What’s the Point If We Can’t Have Fun?

Since Darwin we tend to look at the biological world exclusively in economical terms. The idea that monkey’s, frogs, or even ants do more than simply propagate, doesn’t find much acceptance among scientists. And yet, even crayfishes at times seem to displace objects just for fun.

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Augmented-Bodies

Shock Therapy for a Better Self

“The lines are going to blur, between therapy and enhancement. Between treatment and prevention and between need and desire.”  This is a quote by biophysicist and best-selling author Gregory Stock in his Ted Talk ‘To Update is Human’ from 2003. Eleven Years later we arrived to that predicted level with the habit forming device Pavlok. It is a bracelet that gives you electric shocks if you don’t achieve the set goal. The designer, Maneesh Sethi, pledges an enhancement of your daily life by zapping yourself and changing thereby your old habits.

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Soccket
Calm-technology

“Soccket” Ball Generates Free Electricity

It looks like a normal soccer ball, but Soccket has a secret: a hole for a charging cable. Designed by two Harvard students, the ball has a pendulum-like mechanism inside that stores kinetic energy produced during play. Thirty minutes of play can power an LED lamp for three hours. The plan is to distribute the ball to kids across Africa, helping to bring electricity to rural areas. In this photo, we can see that Soccket also happens to appeal to US presidents.

Source: Reuters

barbie 1
Anthropomorphobia

If Barbie Had Human Proportions

With the daily use of Photoshop to retouch celebrities, it’s not surprising that women feel the pressure to conform to what is essentially an illusion. Starting from this reflection, artist Nickolay Lamm decided to change Barbie’s body proportions to more accurately reflect reality.

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share
Boomeranged Metaphors

Digital Sharing Becomes Physical

Our urge to share everything – photos, food, video games scores – is blurring the line between reality and digital life. Looking at the human history of sharing experiences, it’s highly likely that this line will totally disappear in the near future.

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Back to the Tribe

Serious Gamers Assist Society

Ever imagined that your gaming addiction might help cure cancer? A new generation of computer games have been introduced that deal with citizen science. Citizen science games like Phylo, Foldit and Galaxy Zoo are called serious games, since they carry a serious goal: Providing scientific knowledge through play. This can help with research in topics from life-threatening diseases to decoding ancient manuscripts.

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Augmented-Bodies

Google’s Shoes Talk to Runners

After Google Glasses, the electronic ring and the self-driving car, Google just presented this new surprising product in Austin, Texas, during the South by Southwest Interactive conference. The “talking” sneakers, designed by Google in collaboration with the artist Zach Lieberman and the collective YesYesNo, act like a training coach. Fitted with a whole package of electronic devices like a speed detector, pressure sensors in the soles, a gyroscope, a tiny screen and speakers, the shoes also contain a Bluetooth connection. Therefore, they can provide the runner with information and advice about their activity. Like a real coach, they can also motivate or reprehend you if necessary.

The information is then shown on the tiny screen, which is quite inconvenient for those who aren’t able to look only at their feet while running. But Google has thought about everything: the Bluetooth connection also sends the data to a smartphone app and automatically publishes messages on the user’s Google account, so that anybody can check if you’re taking a sneaky break during your jog. This might be worse than an actual coach!

From Future Sciences.