Tag: Wild-systems


Medical Microbots Used to Perform Biopsy

When acquiring tissue samples for medical diagnosis, doctors have been confined to bulky and invasive instruments. Unlike the scientists in the 1966  sci-film film Fantastic Voyage, we haven’t been able to shrink a submarine and its human crew in order to let them perform some delicate surgery inside the patient body.

But with recent successful experiments, we may see doctors switching from the single forceps to hordes of so-called microgrippers.

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IBM Predicts Artificial Intelligence Future

Watson, IBM’s signature artificial-intelligence system, became famous in 2011 for beating Jeopardy! champion Ken Jennings at his own game. But now IBM has much larger plans for it.

At the World of Watson event held last week in New York, Ginni Rometty, the chairman and CEO of IBM, stood on stage in front of a packed room and announced that she was going to make “a bold prediction”.

“In the future, every decision that mankind makes is going to be informed by a cognitive system like Watson,” she said “and our lives will be better for it”.

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Wild Systems

Hunger Games for Robots

As technology develops and introduces more complex wild systems every day, it is inevitable that some jobs are taken over by our creations. How would you feel if robots inherited ethical complications of existence? This is the question that Berlin-based audiovisual artist Martin Reiche seeks to answer, by pitting robots against each other in a deadly fight for resources.

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Artificial Intelligence

Ever-Changing Sceneries with Microbots

Does the illustration above pique your interest? Then, you should hear the story behind it. Kirsten Zirngibl‘s illustrations depict imaginary landscapes that are formed by microbots, which can be fed with new data to change the scenery entirely. Zirngibl explained that the piece above, called Microzoo, is made of microbots entirely.

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Drone Operated by Honeybee Brain

The Green Brain Project aims to create drones that will think, act and sense like a bee. In order to do this, the team of researchers from the University of Sheffield and University of Sussex in England is now working on recreating the brain structure of the European honeybee Apis mellifera. 

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Artificial Intelligence

Should We Fear Thinking Machines?

From drones in the sky taking pictures and dropping bombs, to smart houses equipped with security systems and automation, it seems thinking machines could put the human race in danger.

In the latest trend of Hollywood’s fascination with artificial intelligence, three new movies pose the conundrum of what happens when we make machines as smart as ourselves, and then try to interact with them. In Avengers: Age of Ultron, a league of superheroes have to put down a robot menace, in Ex Machina a software engineer must be our first contact with a female A.I., and in Chappie a robot cop wakes up to sentience.  How realistic these fears are?

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David Cope and his software Emily
Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Able to Create Music

Emily Howell is an interactive interface that allows both musical and language communication, exploring how a software can be an artist, a musician in particular. A domain previously reserved to humans, is now slowly entered by computers and lines of code.

Programmed by David Cope, professor of music at UCSC, Emily Howell has released two albums. She composes and performs her own pieces of music and can adapt itself to the preferences of the listener.

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Wild Systems

Gameplay of the Crowds

Over a year ago an anonymous Australian programmer started a social experiment called “Twitch Plays Pokémon”. The experiment consisted of a video stream on Twitch of the video game Pokémon Red. Viewers could interact with the video game by sending commands through the chat room of the stream which controlled the avatar of the game in real time. After more than 16 days of continuous playing, the game was completed.

When the experiment started, a few hundred people were watching. However, soon enough the internet caught on and the stream became unexpectedly popular. Instead of a few hundred, tens of thousands of people were watching.
During the remainder of the experiment, an average of 80,000 concurrent viewers was achieved, with a peak of 121,000 simultaneous viewers.
Within days, the experiment spawned many in-jokes, memes and even its own mythology around a specific item that was obtained during the play through. It became a culture of its own.

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Communicating with City Infrastructures

With the Internet of Things, a growing number of objects have sensors implanted inside them. These sensors help to form a network where objects can communicate with each other and with us. A recent project, named GENESI, might make it possible for city infrastructures to join this conversation as well.

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Green Blues

Solar Eclipse May Impact Power Supply Due to Increased Use of Solar Panels

For the first time in human history a solar eclipse is expected to impact our electrical power supply systems. Not because the forthcoming eclipse of 20th march 2015 is bigger or longer lasting than earlier solar eclipses, but rather due to the increased use of solar energy for power supply.

Back in 1999, around the time of the last large solar eclipse in Europe, solar power covered just 0.1 per cent of all the electricity produced in Europe from renewable energy sources. Since then solar power generation increased to at least 10.5 per cent as countries subsidize green power to meet EU renewable energy targets.

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