Tag: Wild-systems

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Wild Systems

Jazz-Playing Robot Challenges Human-Computer Interactions

The relations between human beings and robots are reaching a whole new level, and this program is the living proof, researchers say. The name of this new project is MUSICA (Musical Improvising Collaborative Agent), and its purpose is to come up with a musical robot able to improvise a jazz solo in response to an actual person performing jazz.

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Stewart
Wild Systems

Stewart Helps People to Trust Self-Driving Car

The car used to be a symbol of freedom. The steering wheel allowed us to choose direction and drive where-ever we wanted. The self-driving car will change this. We’ll regain the freedom to do whatever we want – drink alcohol and use smartphones – while driving, but we have to give away a little control. Not everyone can accept this easily, Stewart could help people to get used to giving more control to the car.

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refugees
Suburban Utopia

Could Biomimicry Help us Solve the Refugee Crisis?

Millions of people are, in this very moment, in the midst of one of the biggest refugee crisis of the last several decades. The war in Syria and the unstable situation in the middle East is forcing masses of people into Europe, at a pace and scale that is causing incredible strife. Europe’s ability to absorb an ever growing number of refugees (some data points to 1.5 million people in Germany alone) is put into question both by logistical issues – can these people be taken care of in a proper, humane way? As well as by ideological and political matters – do European nations have the obligation to deal with this problem by themselves? What does this entail?

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Googleween kids
Wild Systems

Self-Driving Cars Practice Kids Recognition

There basically is no better moment to get your software adjusted to unpredictable child behavior. This year’s Halloween, Google decided to ask children from the neighborhood to come by in their spooky outfits and play around the self-driving cars in their parking lot. According to Google, the odd costumes gave their sensors extra practice in child recognition, for children in all shapes and sizes.

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Chrysler robots assembly line
Wild Systems

The Risk of Technological Unemployment

In a Q&A with Reddit, Stephen Hawking – a man known for both his achievements in the realms of science as well as for his public persona as “Einstein in a wheelchair” – gave his opinion on what technological unemployment, aka machines taking over our jobs, can represent for future human societies.

Elaborating on the topic of technological unemployment, Hawking stated that “If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality”.

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Wild Systems

Watch out for Bullied Robots

Dystopian future scenarios filled with evil robots are everywhere. We are afraid of robots treating us badly, but what will happen if it’ll be the other way around? According to Italian researcher Pericle Salvini, it is predictable that if people ruin static objects, they will not leave moving objects alone. At the same time “bullied” or assaulted robots could be far more dangerous than a vandalized telephone cell.

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Wild Systems

AI is as Intelligent as a Four-Year-Old Kid

Computer can already beat us in many tasks. Complicated calculation, processing speed and chess, to name a few. However, generally speaking, you’re still likely to be more intelligent than the most sophisticated Artificial Intelligent system. Researchers at MIT have tried to test the general intelligence of an AI System and found out it’s as smart as a four-year-old child.

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geosphere-biosphere-technosphere
Wild Systems

The Biosphere Code Manifesto

As a result of a discussions that took place during the event The Biosphere Code in Stockholm on 4th October 2015, Stockholm University researcher Victor Galaz and colleagues outlined a manifesto for algorithms in the environment.

The precepts for an in-progress Biosphere Code Manifesto are a recommendation for using algorithms borne out of growing awareness that they so deeply permeate our technology “they consistently and subtly shape human behavior and our influence on the world’s landscapes, oceans, air, and ecosystems” as The Guardian wrote in an extensive article.

We are just starting to understand the effects that algorithms have on our lives. But their environmental impact may be even greater, demanding public scrutiny. Here the Biosphere Code Manifesto v1.0, with its seven principles.

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