Tag: Wild-systems

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Information Decoration

Every Wikipedia Article Leads to Philosophy

Who doesn’t know the Wikipedia races? Using links to travel from one Wikipedia page to another to reach a destination page before the other participants. But there is an interesting phenomenon about them.
“Clicking on the first lowercase link in the main text of a Wikipedia article, and then repeating the process for subsequent articles, usually eventually gets one to the Philosophy article”.

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Wild Systems

Possibilities for Drones in Performing Arts

Drones, we probably have all heard about their many possible uses. Whether they’re seen as a positive development or not, these robotic birds are increasingly employed for practical task, for example in the military. But there’s a more creative application for them as well.

Japanese fashion brand Buyma created this video with a wink, wherein drones play a crucial role. Even though the drones appear to be computer-animated from time to time, it offers an interesting view on how drones could also become a part of (performing) arts in the future.

Via: Mashable

doug
Wild Systems

DOUG: the First Robot Able to Draw

We already talked about robot interactions with human, and we find this topic particularly actual and interesting since the way we handle this collaboration will be crucial for our future. Robots can already read, talk and reason. Yet, they do not seem to have found limits to their artistic skills either. Meet DOUG_1, the drawing robot.

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Wild Systems

Jazz-Playing Robot Challenges Human-Computer Interactions

The relations between human beings and robots are reaching a whole new level, and this program is the living proof, researchers say. The name of this new project is MUSICA (Musical Improvising Collaborative Agent), and its purpose is to come up with a musical robot able to improvise a jazz solo in response to an actual person performing jazz.

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Stewart
Wild Systems

Stewart Helps People to Trust Self-Driving Car

The car used to be a symbol of freedom. The steering wheel allowed us to choose direction and drive where-ever we wanted. The self-driving car will change this. We’ll regain the freedom to do whatever we want – drink alcohol and use smartphones – while driving, but we have to give away a little control. Not everyone can accept this easily, Stewart could help people to get used to giving more control to the car.

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refugees
Suburban Utopia

Could Biomimicry Help us Solve the Refugee Crisis?

Millions of people are, in this very moment, in the midst of one of the biggest refugee crisis of the last several decades. The war in Syria and the unstable situation in the middle East is forcing masses of people into Europe, at a pace and scale that is causing incredible strife. Europe’s ability to absorb an ever growing number of refugees (some data points to 1.5 million people in Germany alone) is put into question both by logistical issues – can these people be taken care of in a proper, humane way? As well as by ideological and political matters – do European nations have the obligation to deal with this problem by themselves? What does this entail?

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Googleween kids
Wild Systems

Self-Driving Cars Practice Kids Recognition

There basically is no better moment to get your software adjusted to unpredictable child behavior. This year’s Halloween, Google decided to ask children from the neighborhood to come by in their spooky outfits and play around the self-driving cars in their parking lot. According to Google, the odd costumes gave their sensors extra practice in child recognition, for children in all shapes and sizes.

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Chrysler robots assembly line
Wild Systems

The Risk of Technological Unemployment

In a Q&A with Reddit, Stephen Hawking – a man known for both his achievements in the realms of science as well as for his public persona as “Einstein in a wheelchair” – gave his opinion on what technological unemployment, aka machines taking over our jobs, can represent for future human societies.

Elaborating on the topic of technological unemployment, Hawking stated that “If machines produce everything we need, the outcome will depend on how things are distributed. Everyone can enjoy a life of luxurious leisure if the machine-produced wealth is shared, or most people can end up miserably poor if the machine-owners successfully lobby against wealth redistribution. So far, the trend seems to be toward the second option, with technology driving ever-increasing inequality”.

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