Tag: Wild-systems


Communicating with City Infrastructures

With the Internet of Things, a growing number of objects have sensors implanted inside them. These sensors help to form a network where objects can communicate with each other and with us. A recent project, named GENESI, might make it possible for city infrastructures to join this conversation as well.

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Green Blues

Solar Eclipse May Impact Power Supply Due to Increased Use of Solar Panels

For the first time in human history a solar eclipse is expected to impact our electrical power supply systems. Not because the forthcoming eclipse of 20th march 2015 is bigger or longer lasting than earlier solar eclipses, but rather due to the increased use of solar energy for power supply.

Back in 1999, around the time of the last large solar eclipse in Europe, solar power covered just 0.1 per cent of all the electricity produced in Europe from renewable energy sources. Since then solar power generation increased to at least 10.5 per cent as countries subsidize green power to meet EU renewable energy targets.

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Teasing the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) products range from smart frying pans that check if the food is cooked, to wearables that track your health. When there is such abundance of areas where IoT could be applied, several ridiculous, unnecessary products are inevitable. Rehabstudio, a creative technology company, draws attention to this pitfall with a parody blog called The Internet of Useless Things.

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Bruce Sterling
Augmented Bodies

Interview: Bruce Sterling on the Convergence of Humans and Machines

Bruce Sterling is a prominent science fiction writer and a pioneer of the cyberpunk genre. His cyberpunk novels Heavy Weather (1994), Islands in the Net (1988), Schismatrix (1985), The Artificial Kid (1980) earned him the nickname “Chairman Bruce”. Apart from his writings, Bruce Sterling is also a professor of internet studies and science fiction at the European Graduate School. He has contributed to several projects within the scheme of futurist theory, founded an environmental aesthetic movement, edited anthologies and he still continues to write for several magazines including Wired, Discover, Architectural Record and The Atlantic.

In the interview below, we had the honor of hosting Bruce Sterling in our Next Nature Network headquarters to talk to him about the concept of the convergence of humans and machines. Sterling weighs in on the issue with a rather challenging perspective.

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Hotel with Robots

The Hotel Run by Robots

Check into a new hotel with the help of a keen robot receptionist. After welcoming you, another bot will carry your luggage to your room, earlier thoroughly cleaned by a non-human housekeeper. At the Henn-na Hotel in Japan, the so-called actroids will make sure you’ll have a nice and memorable stay.

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Robot scientist
Artificial Intelligence

A Robot Scientist Could Cure Malaria

While it is not a common source of fear in Western countries, malaria is a disease highly endemic to tropical countries, Asia and many parts of Africa. A recent WHO report informed that there were about 198 million cases of malaria in 2013. The disease resulted in death of approximately 584,000 people, many of whom were children in Africa. Although there seems to be no effective drug in use for malaria, a scientist robot named Eve may have found a cure.

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Wild Systems

A Self-Aware Mario Able to Learn and Feel

Since his birth in 1985, our favorite plumber Mario has gone through numerous evolutions. Now it is a cult video game that exists on several platforms with many different versions. However, the latest development that Mario went through is the most exciting: the character is now able to learn and feel in the confines of his 8-bit universe.

Three researches, from the University of Tübingen in Germany, gave Mario the ability to live and converse with an adaptive learning artificial intelligence method.

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Wild Systems

Cities Evolve in Similar Ways as Galaxies

Satellite images of Earth at night evoke ambiguous feelings: While on a ground level our cities appear as purely cultural artifacts, a traveler from outer space might just as well marvel at them as beautifully glowing organic fungi-like structures that sprouted on our planet. Less than a millennium ago, the Earth at night was all dark. Today it is all glowing and blossoming.

Scientists think the laws governing the structure of galaxies in outer space are the same laws underlying the growth of cities. Henry Lin and Abraham Loeb at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics have used models for showing how galaxies evolve based on matter density to propose a unifying theory for scaling laws of human populations.

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