Human Planet

Humanity has become a geological force

Today, the human impact on our planet can hardly be underestimated. Climate change, synthetic biology, mass urbanization – ‘We are here’ echoes all over. We have entered the Anthropocene epoch, an age where humanity and its instrumentalities are the most potent and influential geological force. Welcome to the Human Planet.

Essay by Allison Guy and Koert Van Mensvoort

The Anthropocene Explosion

Biologically, there is nothing remarkable in the fact that humans are agents of ecological change and environmental upset. All species transform their surroundings. The dizzying complexity of landscapes on Earth is not just a happy accident of geology and climate, but the result of billions of years of organisms grazing, excavating, defecating, and decomposing.…

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'Human activity may create new species and modes of being'

Allison Guy and Koert Van Mensvoort

The age of rust

Meet the incredible new species “Petramosaurus Cavator” and discover its impact on our planet in this short mockumentary by Aber and Mattei.

Man-Made Coral Reefs

Last week I had the pleasure of being the studio guest at the Earth Beat radio show. I was treated with examples of ‘artificial nature’ and asked to respond from a Next Nature perspective. Among them where these amazing underwater sculptures, created by Jason de Caires Taylor as a man-made coral reef to provide a habitat for sea-life and distract snorkelers from the vulnerable coral reefs elsewhere.…

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Surviving the Anthropocene in China

Edward Wong’s fascinating personal essay reveals the extreme lengths that foreigners and wealthy Chinese go to in order to survive in a country where the air, food and water are toxic. Children are raised indoors, surrounded by high-tech air filters. Adults wear face masks when they venture outside.…

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Antarctica Is Turning Green

Try looking online for images of ‘Antarctica’ and rest assured you will have a series of enchanted pristine white landscapes presented to you on a silver platter. Well that’s about to change as rising temperatures have boosted the growth rates of seasonal moss on the southern part of the continent over the last 50 years.…

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