Plastic Planet

The Plastic Problem #1: Biobased and Biodegradable Plastic

People involved into plastic matters predict that in the next thirty years the consumption of this particular and malleable material will go from the current 300-400 million tons to the double amount, at least. Plastic, or rather plastics were born from petroleum-derived polymers and had immediate success thanks to their mechanical and chemical properties and the low purchase cost.

Read more

fluorescent-microfish-image
Biomimicmarketing

3D Printed Fish Remove Toxins and Deliver Drugs

Researchers at UC San Diego announced that they have developed 3D printed microrobots in the shape of fish able to detect and remove toxin from liquid. Smaller than a human hair – only 120 microns long and 30 microns thick – these little creatures multiply quickly: scientists can 3D print hundreds of these fish in seconds.

Read more

Suburban Utopia

The Bamboo Skyscraper

Inspired by the natural bamboo forests, where a wide range of trees coexist and create an overlapping network, a group of architects looked at natural forests to design the Bamboo Skyscraper. With this project the team at CRG Architects rethought the way we build and asked: what if we stopped cutting into our forests and started recreating them?

Read more


Play video

Forward to Nature

Join us

Virtual worlds, printed food, living cities, wild robots – we’re so surrounded by technology that it’s becoming our next nature. How can we live in harmony with it? The Next Nature Network is a 21st century nature organization that wants to go forward – not back – to nature. We stir debate, create events, exhibitions, publications and products that bring biology and technology into balance. Because ultimately, we may not just have to save the pandas but the people too. Will you join us?

Join us

Anthropocene

Electronic Gadget Cemetery in Ghana

We love buying shiny new gadgets every now and then, but have you ever wondered where your old device ends up when you get rid of it? Agbogbloshie in Ghana is one of the places where electronics, such as computers, mobile phones and televisions, go to die.

Read more

wireless_mouse
Manufactured Animals

Wireless Controlled Mouse, the Animal!

Stanford engineers developed an implantable device to stimulate nerves in mice. It’s a internal remote-controlled LED chip that can make a mouse walk in circles, by using light to activate motor neurons in the animal’s brain, or peripheral nerves throughout its body. The technology is powered wirelessly using the mouse’s own body to transfer energy.

Read more