Tag: Officegarden

furniture farm gavin
Guided Growth

The Designer who Grows Furniture

When Gavin Munro was playing in his garden as a young boy, he noticed that an overgrown bonsai tree had the distinct appearance of a chair. Soon after, he got a spinal graft, requiring him to wear a back brace to heal and align his bones: “There were long periods of staying still, plenty of time to observe everything going on and reflect” he recalls.

Today Munro is creating a farm where planted trees can be grown around braces and harvested as fully formed chairs, sculptures, lamps, and tables.

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Food Technology

Grow your Dinner in a Kitchen Insect Farm

No, this isn’t another lab meat vision from the Bistro In Vitro restaurant. While today’s meat production will be hard to maintain as the world population increases, there are other ways to get our protein fix.

The Kitchen Insect Farm created by Katarina Unger enables you to grow your own protein source at home. The table-top device provides an environment for Black Soldier Fly eggs to grow into larvae that feed on bio-waste.

It takes the device 432 hours to turn one gram of Black Soldier Fly eggs into 2.4 kilogram of larvae protein. Once matured the larvae self-harvest and fall clean and ready to eat into the harvest bucket of the device. A few of the harvested larvae are selected to be dropped back into the top of the machine and start the cycle again.

We especially appreciate the clean medical look of the device, that subtly counterbalances the stereotypical associations people have with consuming insects.


Dynamic Exoskeleton Chair

Prolonged sitting is a common feature in today’s society. Despite the amount of movements our body is capable of, we spend most of our time in sedentary mode.

To respond to the anti-physical modern technology trends, Eindhoven Design Academy graduate Govert Flint developed the Segregation of Joy project. He designed an exoskeleton chair that allows the body to move freely. The user can control the cursor on his computer screen by moving his body in the chair.

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Source: http://www.modernisminc.com/artists/Jonathon_KEATS/?image=SPACETIME_INDUSTRIES-1

Seconds for Sale: Domestication of Time

As society is moving more rapidly and people are busier than ever, a need arises to change the passage of time accordingly. Einstein showed how time is relative and influenced by gravitational force. Time Ingot, by experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats, is a first step to domesticate this relativity for practical human needs.

The ingot is a solid piece of lead alloy, neatly packaged. Due to the compact size, it can be used to manage time on a desktop or on a bed stand. Its mass slows down time in the immediate vicinity. Ideal for planning competitive business or slightly extending lifespan.

With less than one extra second every billion years, the effect is not directly noticeable, and the $19.99 Time Ingot is already out of sale. But at least, it gives us the small opportunity to literally manage time, instead of letting time manage us.

Story and image via The Atlantic

‘Flowerworks’, by Sara Illenberger. Photography: Sabrina Rynas

Happy Next Nature!

Time measurement tools are perhaps among the most inventive technologies mankind has produced, as it enables us to articulate ‘natural’ time (in the form of lunar years, sun eclipse, tidal waves, seasons and of course the day and night rhythm) in measurable units of milliseconds, hours, days, weeks months and years. A process most of us tend to perceive as ‘natural’ but is in fact highly constructed. A calendar year has just passed and a new one has just started, time goes by but evolution goes on. I wish you a very livable Next Nature and a happy new year!

Image: ‘Flowerworks’ by Sarah Illenberger (photography: Sabrina Rynas)


Experimental Office: No Chairs, No Desks

How natural is it to work from nine to five sitting on a chair behind a desk, staring at a computer screen, wearing a suit and tie? Although it is today’s standard, genetically people aren’t really attuned to this norm. To counter the sitting dogma, design firm RAAAF and artist Barbara Visser experimented with more dynamic office concept, entirely based on movement and leaning.

The next office is meant to help combat all of the health problems—from heart disease to diabetes—that the typical desk job can contribute to or exacerbate. Throughout the day, people lean in different positions and keep moving around the room.  Supported by giant rock-like sculptures that presumably invite to a healthier, more active way to work than anything that’s come before.

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The Evolution Of The Desk 1980 – 2014

Over the past decades, objects that normally used to surround us became more and more virtual, radically changing the aspect of our workplace.

A team from Harvard Innovation Lab envisioned the impact of technology on our everyday life, creating a metamorphosis of the desktop through the last 35 years. Cluttered worktables full of tangible tools turned into a clean minimal space.

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Animals Love Technology

While evidence indicates that humans have been domesticated by technology, we’re not the only primates captivated by modernity. A Japanese macaque stole a tourist’s iPhone and fiddled around with it like a human would. Animals appreciate technological innovations as much as we do! Peculiar image of the week by dutch photographer Marsel van Oosten.