Tag: Supermarket

Production At A Kawashima Dairy Farm
Manufactured Animals

From the Super Muscular Pig to the Hypoallergenic Cow: New GMOs May Soon Be on Your Plate

The acronym that keeps Europe awake at night is TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership), a trade and investment deal that the EU is negotiating with the US. From Rome to Brussels consumer groups rise up against it. The reason? This deal could get never-seen-before genetically modified organisms on the supermarket shelves.

Although the trade and the human consumption of GMO animal products are outright banned, there are some bugs in the system, such as the recent “jellyfish-lamb” case. France went into a panic because a lamb that was the offspring of a sheep modified to express a green fluorescent protein made it to market. All over the world biologists are experimenting with animal genomes and the risk of bumping into a “bodybuilder pig” exists. To what extent is there the possibility of having genetically modified animals on our plates? Here an estimate by Wired.

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Food Technology

Seaweed That Tastes Like Bacon

An algae with bacon flavor, high nutritional value and rich in protein? Sounds like a speculative dish from the Bistro In Vitro, but it’s already existing: it’s dulse. Scientists at Oregon State University have been working to engineer and harvest a unique variety of dulse that, when fried, tastes just like the fatty, tasty pork belly but with greater health benefits.

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Order Anything with Amazon’s Button

Just on the eve of April 1, Amazon introduced a new gadget named Dash Button, which will help you order groceries automatically. The timing of the announcement led a lot of people into thinking that it was just another April Fools’ joke, but it turns out that the e-commerce company is pretty serious about its new technology.

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Hydrogel farming
Food Technology

Soil-Free Farming in the Desert

Throughout the lands of the Persian Gulf, desertification is a fact of life. As a result, the countries of this region import 90 percent of their food supply. A new technology developed by visionary researchers at the Waseda University, in Japan, might have found the solution to this problem. A special absorbent film that require no soil may be able to grow plants more efficiently than soil farming.

The research team, lead by Professor Yuichi Mori, has developed a hydrogel film that can hold 1,000 times of its weight in water. The scientists are already testing these films in 180 film farms.

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Food Technology

The World’s Largest Indoor Farm

Humans have mastered agriculture for the last 10.000 years, during which different climates, cultures, and technologies have driven and defined farming development. Nevertheless, a summer storm, voracious pests or a bad drought can still ruin the harvest and destroy months of hard work. But not anymore, according to Japanese plant physiologist Shigeharu Shimamura, who transfered intensive agriculture under the roof.

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100% Organic? Get a Coconut

100% pure organic coconut water would be to drink directly from the coconut. So how organic is this product really? 80% Organic? 70% Organic? Or just slightly more organic than the coconut water without the labeling?

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Chloe Rutzerveld
Food Technology

Interview: Chloé Rutzerveld, Designer Who Wants to Grow Healthy 3D Printed Food

The next guest in our interview series is Chloé Rutzerveld, young talented and promising Food and Concept designer, from Eindhoven University of Technology. Chloé is interested in combining aspects of food, design, nature, culture and life sciences in a form of critical design. She uses food as a medium to address, communicate and discuss social, cultural or scientific issues.

Throughout 2014, Chloé worked on a 3D food printing project, titled Edible Growth, to show how high-tech or lab-produced food doesn’t have to be unhealthy, unnatural or not tasteful. Her concept is an example of a future food product fully natural, healthy, and sustainable.

The working principle combines aspects of nature, science, technology and design: multiple layers containing seeds, spores and yeast are printed according to a personalized 3D file. Within five days the plants and fungi mature and the yeast ferments the solid inside into a liquid. Depending on the preferred intensity, the consumer decides when to harvest and eat the edible. While the project is still speculative due to technological limits, the concept is very intriguing.

We recently talked with Chloé about people’s response to Edible Growth, the profession of food designer and new preparation methods and products that could be on our plate one day. Here’s what she had to say:

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Zero-Waste Grocery Store

A four-strong team of young women from Germany launch a shopping revolution: with their crowdfunded supermarket Original Unverpackt they’re going to ban disposable packages. The shop will open its doors in late summer in Berlin Kreuzberg.

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Back to the Tribe

Indigenous Shopping in the Supermarket

Look at these incredible images of native Africans shopping in a supermarket in Opuwo, Namibia.

Two merging realities, different worlds overlapping inside that modern jungle we call supermarket. The situation is disorienting and absolutely fascinating.

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