Tag: Technorhetoric

IBM_Watson
Anthropomorphobia

IBM Predicts Artificial Intelligence Future

Watson, IBM’s signature artificial-intelligence system, became famous in 2011 for beating Jeopardy! champion Ken Jennings at his own game. But now IBM has much larger plans for it.

At the World of Watson event held last week in New York, Ginni Rometty, the chairman and CEO of IBM, stood on stage in front of a packed room and announced that she was going to make “a bold prediction”.

“In the future, every decision that mankind makes is going to be informed by a cognitive system like Watson,” she said “and our lives will be better for it”.

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GDASSdetroit
Suburban Utopia

Exploring Detroit’s Next Nature

Detroit: Car Cultures, Technomythologies, Networked Urbanism, Guided Growth, The City as Organism, Zombie Media, Ruin Porn… It is about time we explore it from a Next Nature perspective. What better way to do this with an exceptional bunch of people in an exceptional two-week program?

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Large-Hadron-Collider-LHC-565315
Meta-Meta-Reality

Scientists could Reveal a Parallel Universe

One of the most expensive scientific instruments ever built, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, will be driven to its highest energy levels in an attempt to detect or create mini black holes. If the experiment proves to be successful, scientists hope to reveal a new universe.

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bitcoinminepower_
Symbolic-Overdrive

Meet the Modern Miners

The good people of Motherboard gained access to a massive, secretive Bitcoin mine that is said to make 4050 bitcoins a month, which converts to some 800,000 Euro at the current rate. The mine consists of 3,000 computers specifically build to mine for bitcoins and is based in a re-purposed factory in rural northeast China.

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boeing747_sketch from the sixties
Technorhetoric

The Golden Quarter

Some of our greatest cultural and technological achievements took place between 1945 and 1971. Why has progress stalled?

By MICHAEL HANLON

We live in a golden age of technological, medical, scientific and social progress. Look at our computers! Look at our phones! Twenty years ago, the internet was a creaky machine for geeks. Now we can’t imagine life without it. We are on the verge of medical breakthroughs that would have seemed like magic only half a century ago: cloned organs, stem-cell therapies to repair our very DNA. Even now, life expectancy in some rich countries is improving by five hours a day. A day! Surely immortality, or something very like it, is just around the corner.

The notion that our 21st-century world is one of accelerating advances is so dominant that it seems churlish to challenge it. Almost every week we read about ‘new hopes’ for cancer sufferers, developments in the lab that might lead to new cures, talk of a new era of space tourism and super-jets that can fly round the world in a few hours. Yet a moment’s thought tells us that this vision of unparalleled innovation can’t be right, that many of these breathless reports of progress are in fact mere hype, speculation – even fantasy.

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Technorhetoric

Xmas Unwrapped

An expedition along the supply chain, visiting factory floors and productions lines of our fluffy red Santa hats, shiny baubles, tinsel and fake plastic trees. Merry Christmas!

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Anthropomorphobia

Humans Need Not Apply

Warning, this video on the impact of automation on human labor might cause you to re-plot you professional career.

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Designed-by-Evolution

How Technology becomes Nature

In this talk at TEDxGhent, our own Dr. Van Mensvoort shows how technology becomes nature in seven steps and what engineers, inventors, designers and entrepreneurs can learn from that.

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bitsahoy
Designed-by-Evolution

What Bits Want

Digital bits have lives. They work for us, but we totally ignore them. What do bits really want? Here are the life stories of four different bits.

By KEVIN KELLY

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antidronetent
Officegarden

Anti-Drone Tent

Anti Drone Tent is a small construction of emergency blankets that blocks infrared sensing, making it invisible to drones.

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